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During the early Meiji period (1868 – 1912), Japan opened the country to foreign trade and diplomatic relations, and allowed foreign settlements in several areas. At that time, foreigners were permitted to circulate only across a limited zone surrounding the settlements.
When the Port of Kobe was opened in 1868, Arima Onsen was within that circulation zone for foreigners living in Kobe, and was the first hot-spring resort area they frequented in Japan. There were many hotels exclusive to foreigners along the Takimichi street, the Kiyomizu Hotel for instance was known among many others. Many foreigners also had their second houses in Arima where they enjoyed long family vacations. After the destructive Kanto earthquake in 1923, many men of letters moved to the Kansai area, where they were influenced by the culture of foreign settlers who were mainly Europeans. This blend leads to the birth of a unique culture in the Hanshin area between Kobe and Osaka. As a historic symbol in Arima hot-springs, Goshoboh also took part in the formation of that unique culture. One could see that inside the traditional wooden property, an elegant indoor dance hall displayed some exquisite floor parquetry and French made stained glass. The place is still almost intact and used as a salon library.